Frequently Asked Questions

General Questions

How long will the inspection take?
Should I attend the inspection?
How soon can I book an inspection?
What kind of report do you provide?
How objective is the inspection?
Can I call you later if I have questions about the home?
What Standards are used for the inspection?
As a buyer, how do I prepare for the inspection?
As a seller, how do I prepare for the inspection?

New Home Inspection Questions

Should I have my new home inspected?
What kind of problems do you find with a brand new house?
Isn't it a waste of time if you don't find anything wrong?
When is the best time to book a new home inspection, at the pre-delivery inspection (PDI) or near the end of the first year?
Do you offer a discount if I ask you to inspect more than once?

Condominium Inspection Questions

What do you inspect in a condominium townhome or apartment?
Why do you inspect areas that are the condominium corporation's responsibility?
An apartment is not like a house. Why should I bother with a condominium apartment inspection?
Do you charge the same for a house as for an apartment?

 

1

General Questions

How long will the inspection take?
The time required to perform an inspection depends on the size, age and condition. As a guideline, you should plan for the inspection to take 2.5 to 3.5 hours. If you cannot devote that much time to the inspection, we can certainly make other arrangements to try and accommodate your schedule.

Should I attend the inspection?
You are highly encouraged to attend the inspection. That way you can see and learn first hand all the features and any concerns about the house. It is easier and clearer to observe an item than to try and understand a point in a report. By attending the inspection, you also get to ask questions to ensure that you understand the house as best as you can.

How soon can I book an inspection?
Generally speaking, you can get an inspection appointment within 2-3 days. Often an appointment is available on short notice, sometimes even the next day, if there is a cancellation or a change in schedule.

What kind of report do you provide?
The AccuChex report is a valuable, custom written report, specifically created for your inspection. Most other inspection companies provide a generic checklist or binder that is provided by a franchise company or supply company. These other reports are either overly brief or complex. The AccuChex report is generally 25-35 pages of tailored, relevant material, in narrative form. It includes an executive summary of any specific concerns, a costing guide for most common maintenance and repair tasks, and a guide to the care of your home.

How objective is the inspection?
AccuChex is proud to provide COMPLETELY INDEPENDENT INSPECTIONS. You can rest assured that AccuChex is not affiliated with any Real Estate or Construction Company. You have our complete and undivided allegiance.

Can I call you later if I have questions about the home?
Feel free to call with any questions about the home that we have inspected for you. You can call while you are still considering the inspection findings before you make the buying decision about the house. If you do end up buying and moving into the house, you can call with questions for as long as you own the home. There is no charge for this phone service and assistance.

What Standards are used for the inspection?
AccuChex inspects to the Standards of Practice of the Ontario Association of Home Inspectors.

As a buyer, how do I prepare for the inspection?
- You are strongly encouraged to attend the home inspection to hear and see, first hand, the inspection findings and advice.
- Read carefully the Home Inspection agreement before arriving at the inspection. The agreement MUST be signed before the inspection can start.
- Arrive at the property on time, no later than our agreed upon inspection time.
- Please do not bring children or other relatives along during the inspection. They are a distraction, a safety threat, and can interfere with the inspection process.
- Please bring a cheque or cash along with you as payment is due at the time of the inspection.

As a seller, how do I prepare for the inspection?
- You can help ensure that the inspection will go smoothly with as little disruption as possible by providing clear access to all the areas of your home. For example, provide clear access to the water meter, hot water tank, hose faucet shut-off valve, electrical panel, furnace, and the attic hatch (clear the closet if the hatch is in a closet).
- Ensure that this is at least a square meter of space in front of the electrical panel so that there is safe access to the panel.
- Clear the areas under each sink, so that all the plumbing can be seen.
- Remove from the house (or contain) all pets including dogs and cats. This will guard against a pet escaping or being hurt.
- Put away all jewelry, cash or other valuables.
- Closet interiors will be opening and examined for cracks and leaks.
- Turn off all computers in the house (in case a circuit breaker accidentally gets tripped).
- Electric circuits will be tested. You may have to reset clocks or timers, especially in the kitchen or bedrooms.

 

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New Home Inspection Questions

Should I have my new home inspected?
I'm frequently asked this question. Most definitely, yes you should. The home inspection has several components. Education, safety, security as well as protecting your investment.

What kind of problems do you find with a brand new house?
You'd be surprised. Recently I was examining the new gas furnace of a brand new home. I detected a gas leak and the gas company was called. That gas company technician couldn't find the leak until I gave him directions on locating the trouble. He then found the leak, and immediately shut of the gas and red tagged the furnace. Needless to say an explosive situation was avoided and lives were saved.

Isn't it a waste of time if you don't find anything wrong?
First of all, it is rare that we find "nothing wrong" in a house. There is no such thing as a perfect home. Even if the concerns are minor, it is best that they be identified and corrected before they become significant and costly.

In addition, the AccuChex inspection has the added benefit of educating you about the home. The more you know about your house the better off you are. You can save money on future repairs and be aware of changes you should and should not make. Plus AccuChex is available for free follow up phone consultation for as long as you own your house.

When is the best time to book a new home inspection, at the pre-delivery inspection (PDI) or near the end of the first year?
There is no "best time". It really is up to the home buyer. Each choice offers advantages. An inspection during the PDI allows any deficiencies to be added to the builder's list, on the spot. An inspection just after you take possession (and before the furniture arrives) offers timely knowledge. You can add any concerns to the builder's 24 hour or 48 hour list. The sooner you can get the builder working on deficiencies the better. However if you wait until month 10 or 11, you will have had a chance to experience the house for almost a full year. You may have been made aware of concerns just by living in the house.

Do you offer a discount if I ask you to inspect more than once?
Yes. AccuChex offers a special follow-up review of the house for $199. This includes a reporting letter, detailing the issues that the builder should address under the new home warranty program.

 

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Condominium Inspection Questions

What do you inspect in a condominium townhome or apartment?
Inspecting a condominium, even an apartment, is just like any other house inspection. Everything that is visible and accessible is inspected. All the available systems are inspected, the plumbing, heating, a/c, electrical, windows, etc. Even the structure and roof are inspected as they relate to your home.

Why do you inspect areas that are the condominium corporation's responsibility?
There are two reasons for this. There are elements that may be outside your responsibility but have a direct impact on your home. You need to know if these are threats to your home. In addition, it is vital to know how well the condo corporation is managing the complex. If the condo is facing expenses in the future, you can evaluate their financial reserves to ensure that they are adequate to address these needs. The last thing you want to face is a special financial levy shortly after moving in.

An apartment is not like a house. Why should I bother with a condominium apartment inspection?
Again we give you a better idea of the general state of your purchase. The more knowledge you have, the better off you are. Shoddy plumbing or poor electrical work are not limited to single family homes. When you consider the size of the investment you are making in this new home, the home inspection gives you valuable knowledge to help with your decision and also gives you a lifetime of free phone support.

Do you charge the same for a house as for an apartment?
Not necessarily. Pricing is on a case by case basis. Please call 613.792.3330 for a quote.